Strategic Management: Formulation and Implementation

The Phases Of Strategic Change

The process of strategic change can be thought of has having two phases: readiness for change and implanting change. The main characteristics of these phases and the common obstacles to passing through them are summarized in Figure 58 and Figure 59.

Phase One Of Strategic Change

Readiness for change
Being ready for change is a simple, logical, early requirement in a change cycle. Readiness for change can be subdivided into three key stages:
Awareness and understanding
The first stage in the strategic change process is to assess the levels of awareness and understanding and identify the obstacles to improving them. Without widespread awareness of the need for change, most managers will resits the change.
Capability
Assuming that widespread awareness of the need for change does exist management can the proceed with examining whether it has the necessary capabilities to permit the change to take place. It takes time, often years, to train and develop to handle significantly new tasks and to design and implement new management processes. Nonetheless, it is absolutely essential.
Commitment
As awareness and capabilities improve, the task of building commitment to making, supporting, and sustaining changes becomes more important. As the change program proceeds, managers need to monitor the situation carefully and identify any emerging resistance as early as possible.